SparkStarter Allows Your Married Friends to Set You Up

Relationships

SparkStarter Allows Your Married Friends to Set You Up

Justin Lavelle

February 17, 2015

It seems like every day there is a new online dating app coming to market. Part of this has to do with the fact that so many people are now dating online these days. As the numbers grow, so does the demand for different methods to match up with unknown singles in your area.

The latest app to enter the online dating arena is SparkStarter, which utilizes Facebook profiles to help create matches.

Sound like Tinder? Well, not exactly.

While the mechanism of the dating app is similar, with users marking yes or no when a potential match’s Facebook profile photo comes up, what sets it apart is its reliance on a community of non-single people.

Why would a dating app want attached people using it?

No, before you ask, SparkStarter isn’t catering to the swingers market. The app is simply betting that a platform that encourages personal recommendations from people you actually know will be more effective than the current methods of taking a guess based on someone’s photo, location and a few shared interests.

While some sites like OKCupid have taken profile data to the next level, relying on algorithmic matching, most OKC users are likely to have had at least one bad date with a compatibility match of 90% or more. That is, of course, when OKCupid is not experimenting on their users by intentionally matching them with incompatible dates.

So it seems clear that a gap in the matchmaking process of online dating does exist, but how likely is SparkStarter to be successful in filling it?

The app will need to convince enough married and coupled people that it’s worth their time to play matchmaker with their single friends. And this could backfire in the awkward event that a recommended date turns bad. One negative experience is likely to turn a new matchmaker off permanently from such activities.

More importantly, SparkStarter users will need to weigh the trustworthiness endorsements of “friends” on their social networks closely.

While SparkStarter’s approach, like The Grade before it, seeks to elevate the often shallow and ill-considered methods of choosing a date online, in almost all cases your friends won’t have 100% of the information about a person they are recommending for a date.

Follow your common sense and the well-tested best practices for dating unknown people, whether online or off, to ensure your safety.

Read more about SparkStarter on VentureBeat and let us know if you think this idea will work in the comments.

Disclaimer: The above is solely intended for informational purposes and in no way constitutes legal advice or specific recommendations.