Don't Let Your Naked "Selfies" Reach These 3 People

Relationships

Don't Let Your Naked "Selfies" Reach These 3 People

Justin Lavelle

September 3, 2014

There is nothing like a naked celebrity to concentrate  attention on an issue like data theft. This week a major scandal erupted over the hacking of major celebrities iCloud accounts. As a company focused on building trust online, stories like this obviously catch our attention.

If something like this can happen to celebrities who constantly monitor and guard their public images, it likely can happen to you, too. The alleged hacker in this case notably thanked the “many people” who helped contribute to stealing the images. While the safety of storing such sensitive material on the cloud can and will be debated, we thought looking at who you should not trust with such images is a great way to minimize your own risk.

Here are three types of people you should avoid sending naked photos of yourself if you want to ensure those images stay offline:

Dates

Some people like to show off their uninhibited side early on in the dating process with suggestive photos to whet their mate’s appetites. This tends to always be a bad idea. Dating is an extremely ephemeral pursuit and the odds of you having a meaningful relationship with any one date are quite low. However that picture image can live on forever. Platforms like Snapchat have emboldened this type of behavior with the idea that the photos will quickly disappear, but as this article points out, there are many hacks available to retrieve images if someone is so inclined.

Significant Others / Spouses

While many people would never send a sensitive image to a date, a significant other or spouse brings is generally agreed to be a different ballgame. While there is an implied amount of trust involved in such serious relationships, one shouldn’t forget that sadly, many of these relationships -including marriages- will fail at some point. Unfortunately, many will even turn into nasty divorce and custody proceedings. Don’t let that romantic picture turn into a headache, or worse yet, a source of blackmail, later on.

Yourself

You may think your naked selfie is safe on your own device, but you would be wrong. Ignoring the fact that hackers can use increasingly sophisticated means to virtually break into your device or cloud storage account (as in the recent celebrity case), there are more basic reasons to be concerned. Consider that 3.1 million mobile devices are stolen in the US each year and data shows that an American loses a phone every 3.5 seconds.

The next time you have an urge to take or send a naked picture of yourself or mate, ask yourself if you’ve thought through all of the consequences and can feel certain that you won’t regret it later.

Disclaimer: The above is solely intended for informational purposes and in no way constitutes legal advice or specific recommendations.